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The Waypost hosts new monthly Brewers Nights

The Waypost hosts new monthly Brewers Nights



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From a Press Release:

North Portland’s The Waypost Tavern, a continually evolving venue since its start as a coffeehouse in 2006, is putting more focus on local beer, spirits and cider by featuring local producers, starting with brewer David Lederfine and his Awesome Ales in November.

Much like it does with local visual artists, The Waypost will spotlight the work of different brewing, distilling and cider-making artists each month. That means an “opening reception” brewer’s night the first Tuesday of every month, where patrons can meet the brewer, taste a range of their beers and learn a bit of the story behind the beers. Awesome Ales’ reception will be Tuesday, Nov. 4 from 4-7 p.m. “But, unlike other brewer’s nights, this is no one-night stand,” says Jim Parker, the new manager for The Waypost who came up with the idea. “For the remainder of the month, we will devote two to three of our six taps to that brewery, rotating through their portfolio, so people can get a real feel for the brewer’s full lineup.”

Starting in December, that approach will be expanded to include local cider makers and distillers as well. The second Tuesday of the month will be the cider-maker’s reception with a variety of ciders available and for the next four weeks, The Waypost’s cider tap will pour cider’s from that month’s featured cidery. The third Tuesday will be set aside for a distiller’s reception and for the next four weeks, a special cocktail menu will be available, designed around that month’s distillery.

The first featured brewery is Awesome Ales, founded last November by long-time local brewer David Lederfine. In addition to stints at McMennamin’s, Oregon Trail, Three Creeks and the brewery now known as Astoria Brewing, Lederfine was one of the founders of The Snake and Weasel, a beloved Southeast Portland beer joint and music venue in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Awesome Ales is a “gypsy brewer” project, meaning Lederfine does not own his own brewing system, but leases time on other breweries’ equipment. He is currently brewing at Seven Brides Brewing in Silverton.

On tap Nov. 4 will be his 4:19 IPA (after contract brewing a 4:20 IPA during the Snake and Weasel days, Lederfine lost the rights to that name when another brewery trademarked it), Southern Sky (which he describes as a French pale ale) and Spikedriver, his Northwest strong ale. Later in the month a stout may be ready to rotate into the lineup.

“I thought David and Awesome Ales would be perfect to kick off this series at The Waypost,” says Parker. “I have known David since before the Snake and Weasel and The Waypost reminds me of that bar in its heyday. The Snake and Weasel proved you can successfully integrate the music crowd and the beer crowd. We already have a strong following for our eclectic music, and my goal is to create as much excitement for our beer, spirits and cider offerings.”

In December, the featured brewery will be Stormbreaker Brewing (located in the former Amnesia Brewing space), with a reception on Tuesday, Dec. 2 from 4 to 7 p.m. The featured cider maker will be Swift Ciders with a reception Dec. 9 from 4 to 7 p.m. And, the featured distillery will be Dogwood Distilling of Forest Grove with a reception 4 to 7 p.m. On Dec. 16. There will be live music following each reception at 8 p.m.

Michael Newman opened The Waypost as a coffeehouse and venue in April of 2006. In 2011, he joined forces with Seth Prickett to transform The Waypost into a full-fledged bar and venue. The Waypost is open 2 p.m. To 11 p.m. Monday

through Thursday; 2 p.m. to midnight Friday, 10 a.m. to midnight Saturday and 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday. The Waypost is located at 3120 N. Williams Ave. (on the corner of Williams and Fargo). The phone number is 503-367-3182.

www.thewaypost.com.

The post The Waypost hosts new monthly Brewers Nights appeared first on New School Beer.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


Beth Fish Reads

I was introduced to Christopher Kimball decades ago through the magazine Cooks Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen. When he took off on his own a few years ago, he founded the Milk Street media company, which produces television and radio shows as well as a magazine and cookbooks. I've never seen the Milk Street shows, but I have cooked out of several of their cookbooks with good success.

Kimball's newest cookbook is Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, which I received through the Voracious Ambassador program. The idea behind the Tuesday Night cookbook series is to show how easy it is to put together nutritious home-cooked meals, even on busy weeknights the focus of this book is food from all three coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, from North Africa all the way around to southern Spain.

Here are some things I really like about Tuesday Nights Mediterranean. The first three chapters are titled "Fast," "Faster," and "Fastest," corresponding to main dishes that can be made in 40, 35, and 25 minutes. Though my schedule is fairly open, cooks who have to juggle kids' activities and evening obligations with trying to get dinner on the table will appreciate the heads-up on prep times. I didn't test the timing, but I think the estimates are fairly accurate.

The remaining chapters provide recipes for main-dish salads, which can also be used for satisfying lunches vegetarian meals (though not necessarily vegan), soups, and filling sandwiches. Every recipe is accompanied by a full-page photo of the finished dish, an informative introduction, and tips. The directions are straightforward, and the ingredients can easily be found at any grocery store.

I made several recipes from Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, including Shrimp and Couscous with Tomatoes and Toasted Almonds Pork with Kale, Red Wine, and Toasted Garlic Spicy White Beans with Tahini, Lemon, and Parsley and Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard (recipe below). Everything was delicious, and I'd be happy to make any one of these recipes again. I have more recipes marked to try, especially in the salad and vegetarian chapters.

If I have any issue with Tuesday Nights Mediterranean, it's this: experienced cooks may find themselves more inspired by the recipes than inclined to make the exact recipes presented. For example, when I made the spicy white bean recipe, I used the vegetables and beans I had on hand it was the dressing I was most interested in and will definitely make it again for future bean salads. The Sardinian herb soup was terrific, but by the time I swapped ingredients to match what was in my kitchen, I likely had a different soup altogether.

Still, I know many younger home cooks who are eager to make nutritious, from-scratch, quick dinners and are grateful for reliable recipes that can be followed to the tee. No thinking necessary after a long day at work and parenting.

As for me, I'm a fan of this cookbook because I really like the flavor combinations. Among the recipes I plan to make in some form or another are fish with tomatoes and capers (Italian), carrot and sweet potato frittata (Egyptian), spicy beef-stuffed pitas (Levantine), and shrimp and spinach (Greek). Note too that Christopher Kimball's Tuesday Nights Mediterranean would make a great gift for graduates, mothers, fathers, and newlyweds.

I picked the following recipe to share because it was tasty and because I believe it will fit quite a few food preferences. We ate this as a main dish, but it would also pair nicely, as the recipe introduction notes, with grilled or roasted meats.

Tunisian Chickpeas with Swiss Chard
Serves 4
35 minutes

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
  • 1 medium red onion, chopped
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Two 15½-ounce cans chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • One 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 large bunch Swiss chard (about 1 pound), stems finely chopped, leaves roughly chopped, reserved separately
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • Lemon wedges, to serve

Bring to a simmer, then cover, reduce to medium-low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion and chard stems have softened, 10 to 14 minutes. With the pot still on medium-low, use a potato masher or the back of a large spoon to roughly mash the mixture it's fine if many of the chickpeas remain whole.

Return to a simmer over medium-high, then add the chard leaves. Cook, stirring, until they are wilted, 2 to 3 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Serve with a drizzle of oil and lemon wedges on the side.

Note: Recipe and scans shared in the context of review all rights remain with the original copyright holder.


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